Saturday, June 6, 2009

The Long and Drawn Out



At the moment there is nothing long about this Swiss Cheese Scarf and even though it’s full of holes, it’s fast becoming one drawn out affair. Relegated to pockets of time requiring high portability, low concentration crafting activity, i.e. the weekly swimming lesson (not mine), four months has yielded 23 inches of (ventilated) woolly warmth. At this rate I’ll have my scarf ready to roll somewhere in the middle of our scorching summer holiday, in which case I'll no doubt be appreciative of air holes.

As much as I am impatient for things to get a wriggle on, (it’s scarf weather NOW), I am thoroughly enjoying the knit. It has been hanging around for so long, it’s become an old friend. I am also loving the texture of the garter stitch as it navigates its way around the holey pattern and am constantly stretching the wool pretending to check for mistakes but really looking for secret ooh! and aah! opportunity. Because I have done one of these scarves in the same wool before, I also know how well it blocks and that I am not living in the land of wishful thinking to really push the stretch and savour the texture.



My first Swiss Cheese Scarf, (find the free pattern here – you’ll need to do the sign up thing at Ravelry), headed off to a friend in Holland and required a whole lot more concentration. If you knit as per the pattern you will end up with small holes that look like a dropped stitch, either side of the big holes. Many don’t seem to mind, but I couldn’t squint enough to ignore them. Here is the formula I was happy with after some experimentation, or try Ravelry for alternative suggestions.



Have a lovely (and, for we lucky Aussies, long) weekend!

12 comments:

Madeline said...

Enjoy your long weekend, you lucky thing! The scarf is coming along beautifully. Can't wait to see the finished product.

Hayley Egan said...

I am in awe of your poolside knitting. It's lovely, and I'm sure you'll get to wear it before next year's tennis...Although with all the activities you seem to be doing you may have to investigate whether the swimming instructor does post-lesson baby-sitting.

elly bee said...

As the proud owner of the first edition of the Swiss Cheese Scarf (I prefer to name it Dutch Cheese Scarf) I can just say that everybody gives Oooooh's and Aaaah's when I'm wearing it. The Ducth climate is designed for Cheese scarves!
And as soon as my new camera has arrived I will send you a picture of the proud owner and the 'male-model' (he is doing quiet well) can be off duty.
eb

One Flew Over said...

I have seen so many swiss cheese scarfs on ravelry but I love your charcoal one...perfect for Winter!

Amanda said...

Gorgeous job you did, I love ravelry, signed up a couple of months ago and have a huge list of projects to try! Love the effect on this scarf.

Tasha said...

oh that is gorgeous! It's times like this I wish I could knit instead of being a crochet demon!! Maybe that can be my winter challenge, practising up my knitting skills ;) Oh and thanks so much for sending me the info I needed in my desperate hour ;)

Nikki @ My Black Cardigan said...

Wow, wow, wow. It is amazing. I keep looking at it, thinking "how?". You are very clever.

Sandrine said...

very nice, looks so perfect!Happy long weekend;)

Michelle said...

Oh! It's beautiful!!

Have a great weekend!

SmitoniusAndSonata said...

Like everything you make , extremely desirable ..... if only I could knit intentional holes .

Kaylovesvintage said...

looks wonderful

katie@weheartbooks.com said...

I started a Swiss Cheese Scarf, in a beautiful blue, for my mum. But encountered difficulties getting the second row of 'holes' to line up, and had to un-do the whole thing (I'd already been cheating along the way...). Agggh. Haven't had the courage or concentration to pick it up again. This post has inspired me though... Maybe ready for next winter?